Tag Archives: play

IMAGINATIONSHIP

imaginationship eflyer 4

Hugely excited to announce that my play IMAGINATIONSHIP will run at the Finborough Theatre , London, for three weeks in January 2018.

Directed by Tricia Thorns, the play is set in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. 59-year-old Ginnie attempts to seduce her unrequited love, the nymphomaniac Brenda. Attila is from Hungary but has ended up scraping an existence in Yarmouth – and pursues Melody who is obsessed with her cold and distant evening-class tutor, Tony. Power-plays and relationships clash until a seduction too far leads to mass murder.

Set in this marginalised Brexit town, Imaginationship explores obsession, sex addiction, and the devastating effect of imbalanced relationships, not least between immigrants and locals, London and the regions.

BOOK HERE

Featuring:

 Joanna Bending – Melody

Jilly Bond – Ginnie

George Howard – Gediminas

John Sackville – Baz

Bart Suavek – Attila

Patience Tomlinson – Brenda

Rupert Wickham – Tony

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Shortlisting!

 

Happy daze

My play, “That Brazen Electric Strap of a Wan”, has been shortlisted to the final six for this years Eamon Keane Full Length Play Award,  at the Listowel International Writers’ Festival in Ireland. Very happy with this news – this script is buzzing….


Cornwall Ahoy!

A little ship has come home to port, fittingly a Cornish one.

If you follow my blog, you’ll be aware that I liken my speculative writing send-outs to ships. I keep a ‘ship’s log’ of the short stories, plays and other texts that I’ve sent off and their fate. The idea of surrendering my ships to the waves, where I am no longer responsible for them, appeals to me. Once it’s gone, it will either sink or come home to port laden with the encouragement provided by a publication acceptance, an award or recognition in some form. And a ship home to port is cause for celebration, no matter how little the vessel.

Yesterday, I received news that a one act play I wrote, ‘The Angel of Szepfalu’, was runner up in the annual play-writing prize run by STERTS Theatre, Cornwall. As runner up, I receive a small cheque and a rehearsed reading of my play at the theatre. I’m travelling to Cornwall for the same. It might seem like quite a trip (from Norwich) just for a rehearsed reading but any recognition of a writer’s work needs to be embraced. I’m flattered that they like my play and want to support any organisation which does the same.

This will be the third rehearsed reading of my work. Previously, my rehearsed readings have taken place in Brighton and Norfolk. So, if nothing else, my plays are taking me on a tour of coastal England – rather fitting for ships.


Be Good in 2013

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I’m back in Norwich following a stint on Inis Oirr as artist-in-residence, which has (I think) birthed a one man play. It was a significant month spent in a dramatic two mile long theatre edged with thrashing waves, and crossed with stone walls, fields created from seaweed and topped with goats – lots of wild goats. During my time there I learned to felt, started up a writing group with some local scribes – which is continuing on – and thought and walked a lot and came to some decisions about my future and where my writing is going.

I had a few bits of bad news while I was out on the island, some personal stuff that unsettled me, and also I learned that man a grew up with was tragically drowned whilst fishing off the Waterford coast. These incidents coloured my thought processes and made me dwell on some topics that I might otherwise have avoided. And I’m glad I let myself go there. I believe I’ve created good art.

I returned to pick up an award. It hasn’t been officially announced yet,, so more on that later. And my play ‘Cow’ is going into the studio next week so I’m pretty focused on that at the moment. One of my parting gifts from the kind people of Inis Oirr was a big 2013 wall chart (in Irish) which I’m now filling up. 2013 looks like it is going to be a year of change. A year of travel and a year of moving forward.  Right now, I’m ready for action and am lining all my plans up.  Life is too short, make the best of it, surround yourself with good people and do good things.


What Kind of Beast is This?

What sort of beast is this?

One of the questions most frequently asked in creative writing classes is “how long is a novel/play/short story/screenplay?” And, as is often the case in creative writing, the answer is that there are no rules but… there kind of are.

There is not an official cut off word count for any of the above literary forms but the publishing industry has generally accepted average lengths. Be alive to the fact that just because your word count has hit the “magic number”, it does not follow that you are finished. Apart from the fact you’ll be lobbing off at least a third in edits, you also need be sure that you have brought all the strands of your story to satisfactory conclusion, have made your point and your character has undergone some sort of change / journey / learning arc in the process. Otherwise, to paraphrase Truman Capote, your’re just typing.

What follows is a rough guide/ballpark figure for each literary form:

 Novel

The average commercial novel is 78,000 words in length; this roughly amounts to 300 A4 pages in double spaced twelve-point font. However, a novel can be anything from 45,000 words onwards. A book between 20,000 – 45,000 is usually marketed as a “novella”.

 Short Story

Traditionally, a short story is meant to be read in one sitting. Normally, this narrative form is quite pointed in its message, involves a single setting and few characters. A short story can be anything from 1,000-20,000 words.Writing short stories is a good way of building up your story telling skills, honing your craft as a writer and amassing a writing portfolio. Also, the short story is the literary form favoured by writing competitions. Such competitions usually look for stories in the 2,000-5,000 word bracket.

Flash Fiction

This is the short story’s kid brother. Somewhat akin to the Haiku, a flash fiction story often aims to capture a fleeting moment. It can be any thing between 100-1,000 words. Flash fiction is becoming very popular in competitions these days. Personally, I think this may be to save reading time for judges.

Screenplay

The standard “Hollywood” screenplay is 90 minutes long. Given the rule of thumb that one page equals one minute of movie, you should be aiming for a90-page long screen play. Obviously, this is an approximation.

 TV/Play

Likewise, the page per minute rule applies here too. Bear in mind the slot your are aiming for. commercial TV and radio stations will include advert breaks in their schedule – so a half hour comedy show might in fact be only 22 minutes long etc… If you have a slot in mind, time the duration of the actual show (excluding theme music and commercial breaks.)

 Stageplay

The page per minute rule can roughly be applied to stage plays too. If a stage play were to last an hour and a half, it should be 20,000 words long and span 90 pages.

 Poem

A poem can be as short or as long as you like. A  haiku is traditionally 17 syllables over three line. The Iliad is 25,000 lines long. For the try outs, however, you might aim for two or three verses.