Through the Looking Glass

There are writers feel story and character ideas are fed to them from “somewhere else”, a parallel universe perhaps, where these characters and stories truly exist.

 

 

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My no. 1 flat in Budapest – photo Nannette Vinson

Clearly, that “somewhere else” is a very vague concept and means different things to different scribes. Nonetheless, writers who hold such beliefs say it is very important to allow your mind to be open to receiving these ideas – wherever they come from.

Personally, I’ve had moments when I felt plugged into a conduit, receiving stories, characters and ideas- though I hesitate to say if this was a spiritual event or just the  way the brain works in creative mode.

And it is a rare enough event – I can never conjure ‘the writing rapture’ but if I write often it’ll roll around every now and again. And when it does, it’s a  magical moment when stories and characters come swimming to me, all done-up, pre-packaged and ready to go.

All we can do is sit down to write every day- most days you’ll get coal but if you keep at it, the diamond muse will show up sooner or later.

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About suehealy

Irish writer/playwright Sue Healy’s work has been supported and developed by Arts Council England, Dublin’s Abbey Theatre, the Peggy Ramsay Foundation, the Heinrich Boll Association and Waterford Corporation/Tyrone Guthrie Centre. Her short play ‘The Dog in the Tree House‘ won the 2017 Claremorris Fringe Award. In 2016, her debut stage production, ‘Brazen Strap’ showed at the King’s Head Theatre. She was a finalist for the 2016 Eamon Keane Playwriting Prize, the 2016 Nick Darke Award and the 2016 Old Vic 12. In 2017, her work shows at the Hackney Attic (January) and the Etcetra Theatre (April). Sue’s nine radio dramas have broadcast on BBC Radio 4,WLRfm, KCLR96fm. She has also won the Sussex Playwrights’ Award, presented in the Festival of Contemporary European Drama and has had staged readings of her work in London, Norwich, Brighton and Cornwall. A UEA Creative Writing MA alumna, Sue’s prose won seven national prizes: the Molly Keane Memorial Award, BBC Opening Lines, Escalator Prize and HiSSAC Award. She spent eleven years in Budapest, editing Hungary A.M. Presently, she is London-based, researching a PhD on the Royal Court Theatre. Sue is Deputy Literary Manager at the Finborough Theatre. View all posts by suehealy

15 responses to “Through the Looking Glass

  • David Barker

    Hi Sue, great post. I’ve had this experience many times while writing, the feeling that characters, actions, dialog are coming to me effortless, as if I am channeling them. Also, I’ve often dreamed scenes for stories I’m writing, or even seen the already written page, and when I wake up, I recall all the words, and write them down verbatim. As you say, either it’s a gift from “out there”, or it’s how the creative mind works.

  • Ignorethebucklesonmyjacket

    I walk around during the day next to my “characters.” I can sometimes see how they would deal with situations…and it sparks ideas and real life scenarios. I can channel those when I get a chance to sit down at the end of the day.

  • Kourtney Heintz

    I never question where the inspiration comes from. I just scribble it down when it comes and be thankful for its arrival. 🙂

  • Lynn Lusty

    Sue, I’ve had this same experiece as well. Once, I wrote an entire short story as if the character was dictating it to me – telling me the story from her perspective.

    I believe in letting the universe talk to us. If it wants to tell me stories; I will listen.

  • Maria S McDonald

    I know what you mean – it’s very hard to explain that ‘somewhere else’ concept, but I always welcome it when I go there and find everything comes so easily and naturally (and as you say, pre-packaged). It’s like a divine intervention!

  • BB_Baker

    In Richard Matheson’s book “What Dreams May Come”, some people in the afterlife work as our muse. They create things for artists, scientists and others and funnel it back to us.

    I loved the idea of it and I wonder if that’s how it works. Had to share that. Great post.

  • Sherry Isaac

    My best stories flow with little effort… until editing begins. But the core structure is there, pristine and complete. Love it when that happens, but there is always work involved. Rather than crediting to a muse, I think of those times as seizing the moment when a fresh idea, seasoned from my experiences, comes to a boil.

  • sfbell09

    I have always liked Ray Bradbury’s introduction to his television show where the camera pans around a knick-knack filled office and Ray’s narration says that for inspiration he just looks around the room. I tend to follow that thought and surround myself with music, sci-fi / fantasy books, movies, memorabilia and other things that inspire me. From that pool of influences I find my characters and stories. I cannot discount external sources though, because to be frank (and I apologize for it) a lot of good ideas happen in the shower where there is only soap and water.

  • Susannah Bianchi

    Jean Kerr is a muse for me. She was a humorist in the 50s and 60s and if I read a couple of her silly essays I feel replenished.

    Nice post

  • EllaDee

    I have little control over it: it comes when, where & how it wants… and I’m grateful. I also like BB Baker’s comment about muses from the afterlife. I’m not sure who my writing muse/s is/are, but when I cook my kitchen is crowded with cooking muses from the afterlife, and I know who they are!

  • frasersherman

    Jean Kerr was funny as heck. I assistant-directed a play by her some years back (wanted the supporting male role, but no such luck).
    I often (almost always) feel like my unconscious knows the story before I figure it out. Chipping it out is never a smooth process though.

  • bardessdmdenton

    Very good, Sue and very true. I used to wait for inspiration…lots of procrastination when it didn’t seem to come…now I realize to keep writing. Kind of like a panhandler sifting through the mud for gold.

    Thanks for sharing! Diane

  • Marvin the Martian

    It would be simplest if we could all sit down and just channel Heinlein or Asimov, wouldn’t it!

  • Robin Hawke

    I subscribe. It’s not a hunt but an alert wait.

  • made love

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    having a blog like yours would cost a pretty penny?
    I’m not very internet savvy so I’m not 100% sure. Any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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