The Third Man

It was the day John went to work in his boxer shorts.

The third person (he/she/it) is the most common narrative point-of-view. The third person observes the main character(s) from a distance, describing how others might see/consider your protagonist. In other words, it gives the narrator greater scope and view privileges than the first person narrator.

If you are writing an extended piece of fiction, you might find it easier and more accommodating to work with a third person narrator. The following are some varieties of this narrative point-of-view

* Nowadays, it is common to have a third person narrator that observes your main character whilst simultaneously looking over his/her shoulder and seeing the story almost from his/her point of view. This ‘over-the-shoulder’ third person narrator can provide some of the advantages of the first person without the drawbacks – however, it is somewhat limited as you are largely viewing events from your character’s POV. For emerging writers, this third person narrative may be a safer bet if wanting to attract an agent.

* You may want your narrator to be quite separate from your character, however. In which case, you could have your narrator follow him/her from a distance, observing actions as if a camera and not directly informing the reader of the character’s inner thoughts.

* Or you could have an omniscient third person narrator – a ‘God-like’ storyteller who sees all and knows all.

The “It” narrative

This is an unusual form of third person narration that tells a tale from the point of view of an object or an animal. An “it” narrative might conceivably be the story of a ring, told by the ring, as it recounts its many owners etc…

Multi narrators

Some books/plays/films are narratives told from various POVs. More common in Victorian prose than in contemporary writing, multi narrators allow for a vigorous description of a community and is useful if the author wants to concentrate on the interconnectivity of a place.

Whichever variety you choose, it is important to be style consistent throughout your work (or if you aren’t, have a reason for that).

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About suehealy

Irish writer/playwright Sue Healy’s work has been supported and developed by Arts Council England, Dublin’s Abbey Theatre, the Peggy Ramsay Foundation, the Heinrich Boll Association and Waterford Corporation/Tyrone Guthrie Centre. Her short play ‘The Dog in the Tree House‘ won the 2017 Claremorris Fringe Award. In 2016, her debut stage production, ‘Brazen Strap’ showed at the King’s Head Theatre. She was a finalist for the 2016 Eamon Keane Playwriting Prize, the 2016 Nick Darke Award and the 2016 Old Vic 12. In 2017, her work shows at the Hackney Attic (January) and the Etcetra Theatre (April). Sue’s nine radio dramas have broadcast on BBC Radio 4,WLRfm, KCLR96fm. She has also won the Sussex Playwrights’ Award, presented in the Festival of Contemporary European Drama and has had staged readings of her work in London, Norwich, Brighton and Cornwall. A UEA Creative Writing MA alumna, Sue’s prose won seven national prizes: the Molly Keane Memorial Award, BBC Opening Lines, Escalator Prize and HiSSAC Award. She spent eleven years in Budapest, editing Hungary A.M. Presently, she is London-based, researching a PhD on the Royal Court Theatre. Sue is Deputy Literary Manager at the Finborough Theatre. View all posts by suehealy

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