Tag Archives: romance

Falling in Love

Lovers in Central Park

 

My newest short story, and theatre piece is a Romance, a love story which celebrates love. This is a bit of a departure for me. I’m feeling rather sheepish about it as I’ve always written about misfits and misanthropes, lame ducks and lushes, the crazed and the confused – set in bizarre situations, where there is rarely a happy ending, but everyone has a great time before they all die in the end. And no one every falls in love outside some sort of sexually confused stalking type thing…

But since August, I’ve written two love stories with, well, I’m not going to say ‘happy’ but certainly satisfying endings. My new stories are not, I hope, clichés and they deal with meaty issues (infertility, instinct etc…) So, I haven’t begun to wear pink chiffon or whatever. Still, they are love stories. So, what is happening to me?

I’m thinking it’s a sign of maturity at a writer. I avoided romance before as I felt the darker side was the deeper, the more intellectual and philosophical.

However, I’ve found that recently my writing has become more comfortable portraying real people in everyday events, which includes falling in love. And I’m enjoying exploring this soft, sensitive territory and I’m hoping I’m doing it justice. And I believe this is a sign of me progressing as a writer.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got to go feed caviar to my poodle who’s just pee-d on my pink satin cushion.

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Think Outside the Castle

Aliens invade Liverpool building?

When considering the setting for your story you turn to atmosphere. What mood do you want to give your work? If you require a spooky setting, you may be inclined to set your story in an environment that most would find unnerving such as a disused factory, an isolated house, a museum at night etc… If your novel is a romance, then perhaps an elegant European hotel on a lake might do the trick. Although….

Challenging Your Readers’ Preconceptions

…You could think about capturing your reader’s imagination by turning settings on their head. In Alex Garland’s book, The Beach, he took a paradisiacal environment and made it a hellish place, as did William Golding in Lord of the Flies.

Likewise, you could take a grim, poor council estate riddled with crime and drugs and set a love story there. Endear its readers by accentuating the positives in the ugly setting (sense of community spirit, humour etc…).

Surprise and challenge your readers’ preconceptions, it will make for a memorable tale. Why not take a suburban house and people it with elves to create a Fantasy novel. What about an action thriller set around the world of chess? Or yoga? Horror often works all the better when set in a mundane, everyday location rather than Dracula’s Castle. Think outside that castle.

A Family of Trolls Move to Amagansett, East Hampton?